Atrazine in a sentence | Use of the word atrazine examples

For example, atrazine is the most commonly used herbicide in the US, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

atrazine is produced by Sygenta, a Swiss chemicals company, and was banned in the EU in 2003 because of concerns about its “long term persistence in the environment, together with toxicity for wildlife and possible link to effects on human health.”

Tyrone Hayes, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, found that atrazine chemically castrates male frogs.

According to the letter, which cites a May 2 story by Reuters, the committee is looking into the EPA’s recent actions related to the agency’s multi-year review of potential risks tied to glyphosate and atrazine, another popular chemical used in agricultural herbicides.

That report found that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the world’s mostly widely used weedkiller, was “not likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” Another document also published on the regulations.gov website that the EPA manages and pulled down on May 2, was a preliminary assessment of the ecological risks of atrazine.

Among other things, the report stated that atrazine effects exceeded EPA’s “levels of concern” for chronic risk by 198 times for mammals, and 62 times for fish.

The team worked with the four commonly used herbicides: mesotrione, topramezone, nicosulfuron and atrazine.

As a control, one field was treated with atrazine before the corn was planted (a full control using no herbicides at all would have been destroyed by weeds without an overwhelming amount of hand weeding).

They include many cleaning products, some pesticides and the common herbicide atrazine.

The WHO’s IARC last year classified glyphosate as “probably carcinogenic to humans.” The House’s Agriculture Committee previously said it too was examining the agency’s review of glyphosate and atrazine, another chemical used in agricultural herbicides.

Earlier this week, the U.S. House of Representative’s agriculture committee sent a similar letter to the EPA, saying it was examining the agency’s review of glyphosate, the chemical in Monsanto Co’s Roundup herbicide, and atrazine, another chemical used in agricultural herbicides.

According to the letter, which cites a May 2 story by Reuters, the committee is looking into the EPA’s recent actions related to the agency’s multi-year review of potential risks tied to glyphosate and atrazine, another popular chemical used in agricultural herbicides.

That report found that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the world’s mostly widely used weedkiller, was “not likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” [L2N17Z1TZ] Another document also published on the regulations.gov website that the EPA manages and pulled down on May 2, was a preliminary assessment of the ecological risks of atrazine.

Among other things, the report stated that atrazine effects exceeded EPA’s “levels of concern” for chronic risk by 198 times for mammals, and 62 times for fish.

atrazine, another commonly used agro-chemical, turns male frogs into females at 1 part per billion.

He has focused on the Syngenta product atrazine — the second most popular weed killer in America, widely used on lawns and crops — often co-authoring research with Syngenta scientists.

atrazine, banned in the European Union, has also been controversial in America.

Most notably, Syngenta started a campaign to discredit Tyrone B. Hayes, a professor it once funded at the University of California, Berkeley, when Dr. Hayes found that atrazine changes the sex of frogs.

In 2003, he appeared before American regulators on Syngenta’s behalf, saying that “we can identify no biologically plausible mechanism by which atrazine leads to an increase in prostate cancer.” Dr. Simpkins was also lead author of a 2011 study finding no support that atrazine causes breast cancer.

And last year, he was part of a small team of Syngenta-backed scientists that fought California’s move to require that atrazine be sold with a warning label.

He also recently edited a series of papers on atrazine for Syngenta, garnering praise from a senior researcher at the company, Charles Breckenridge, who wrote in an email that the “papers tell a simple, yet compelling story.” The depth of the financial intertwining of Dr. Simpkins and Syngenta was laid out in nearly 2,000 pages of email traffic, obtained by The Times after a Freedom of Information Act request.

But a review of Dr. Simpkins’s published work shows that he wrote favorable atrazine studies with Syngenta scientists in 2014 and 2015, and listed his university affiliation.

In 2003, the European Union banned one of the most popular weed killers in America, Syngenta’s atrazine.

At a meeting last year in Rome, European regulators pushed to add atrazine, another Syngenta weed killer, to the list.

But a government representative from India — which itself operates a pesticide manufacturer — was more voluble in defending atrazine than a Syngenta lobbyist who was present.

In a mid-July assessment of atrazine, a widely used weed killer long banned in Europe, the agency reviewed and dismissed 12 recent epidemiological studies linking the herbicide to such ailments as childhood leukemia and Parkinson’s disease.

It echoed the conclusions of research funded by Syngenta, atrazine’s manufacturer, finding the chemical unlikely to cause cancer.

In what might be Jones’s most famous viral video, he rants about chemicals “turning frogs gay,” referring to endocrine changes in amphibians that are caused by a class of chemical called atrazine.

In the Jones cosmology, atrazine’s harmful effects on frogs are not the by-product of lax industrial regulation; they are evidence of a willful program to chemically castrate an unruly citizenry before subjugating them.

Pesticides EPA proposed increasing the allowable levels of the herbicide atrazine, which is used by professionals to kill weeds on crops and lawns.

The Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group, says 35 countries have banned or are phasing out their use of atrazine and called EPA’s proposal a “disgusting backward step.”

Agriculture Late last year, the EPA proposed increasing the allowable levels of the herbicide atrazine, which is used commercially to kill weeds on crops and lawns.

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